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How To Draw A Perfect Cube In Perspective

7 comments:

Sporeczek said...

Thanks, it works even for other figures, not only for cubes :) I was looking for it long time :) ...but i have strange question: why and how it works ? why these points and lines gives perfect figure ? sorry for my english, i hope that you understand :)

Ben said...

Computers use matrixes to figure out perspective. But the method I describe here uses geometry, well, calculus really. The closer the vanishing point is to the center of vision the greater the rate it gets smaller. The measuring point determines the rate of diminishing based on the distance from the viewer to the vanishing point. You can figure out exactly how much smaller an object will look at a certain distance based on how far away the vanishing point is from the center of view. It is a linear function. On top of that, the distance of the vanishing point from the center of view is a complex function.

Paul said...

How do you do this for a cube in one point perspective?

Ben said...

In 1-point perspective, it is easiest to start with the cube's face facing you, like this. The measuring point location depends on the viewer's distance to the cube, so it can really be anywhere, but a good place to put it is 60 degrees from the viewing point, like in that demonstration. From there, you can turn and twist the object as I explain here: http://architecturerevived.blogspot.com/2014/02/perspective-drawing-tutorial-art.html#turn

Mike Fladlien said...

thank you.

Leonardo Obara said...

Nice tutorial!
But I have one question.
You taught that we first draw lines that meet at a 90 degree angle, and from that we find where the side G will be. So what about when we want to do it in the reverse order? I choose where I want to place the side G and then need to draw lines that meet at a 90 degree angle on my desired place?
Is there also a good trick for doing that?

B said...

Leonardo, good question. Start with your vertical line G within 2 vanishing points. Imagine you attach a string between the vanishing points. Pull that string down wherever your line G is, until it forms a 90 degree angle at your finger. This gives you your distance point.

You could also forgo the measuring point shortcut entirely and locate your vanishing points based on where your line G starts at. See my brief tutorial for finding vanishing points from an object in space.

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